What's in my skincare?

We tell you exactly what's in your skincare and why it's in there.

Bolt Beauty - Travel cleanser - filthy clean

FILTHY
CLEAN

Bolt Beauty - travel skincare - Glow Don't Shine

GLOW DON'T
SHINE

Bolt Beauty - travel skincare -

VITAMIN A
GAME

Bolt Beauty - travel moisturiser - Mad About Moisture

MAD ABOUT
MOISTURE



Bolt Beauty - travel cleanser - Filthy Clean

FILTHY
CLEAN

Bolt Beauty - travel skincare - Glow Don't Shine

GLOW DON'T
SHINE

Bolt Beauty - travel skincare - retinol - Vitamin A Game

VITAMIN A
GAME

Bolt Beauty - Travel moisturiser - Mad About Moisture

MAD ABOUT
MOISTURE



Some handy skincare concepts.

In the ingredient descriptions, we've put a little * next to each key concept we explain in this section.


What are Antioxidants?

Antioxidants are really important for the skin (and your body more generally) as they help protect you from damage caused by normal life. Lots of scientific studies support the importance of antioxidants and the role they play in skincare – especially in fighting the signs of ageing, like fine lines, sagging skin and pigmentation.  

Our skin is under constant assault by daily life: sun exposure, and air pollution like car exhaust fumes, or cigarette smoke. All these things negatively impact our skin’s ability to repair itself and look healthy. Antioxidants defend our skin from damage by limiting the production of “free radicals”. “Free radicals” are unstable molecules all around us – including in our skin, the air and pollution. They cause havoc by stealing electrons from the healthy cells in our skin. When a “free radical” manages to take an electron from a healthy cell, this causes the healthy skin cell to also become a “free radical” leaving us now with two unbalanced skin-cells. Antioxidants calm the situation by donating their spare electrons to the “free radical” which stops them from causing damage. They manage to calm the “free radicals” without also becoming a problem.

What do Emollients do?

Emollients are crucial in skincare as they create a super fine layer on top of our skin which helps our skin to trap in the moisture. (Don’t worry, the emollients we use don’t clog pores or cause break-outs. Also, in case you were wondering, you won’t feel them sitting on top of your skin. Phew!)

What do Emulsifiers Do?

In a nutshell, ingredients with emulsifying properties let two things which normally repel, come nicely together - in skincare this is normally oil and water. They do this by reducing the surface tension between these ingredients, letting them mix and form a great textured product.

If emulsifiers were not included in cosmetics products, you’d see lots of separation between the “incompatible” ingredients. Think of what happens to balsamic vinegar when you add it to olive oil, it sits separately with the balsamic making dark, delicious blobs in the olive oil. If you added an emulsifier, the olive oil and balsamic would mix together as the new ingredient would lower the surface tension between the oil and balsamic. Unlike our olive oil and balsamic mix, in skincare, most of the time we want a nicely blended products that have a lovely consistency. The emulsifier helps us to achieve this by bringing together the normally incompatible ingredients.

You’ll also read about “surfactants” in skincare and they sound an awful lot like they do the same thing as emulsifiers. Both reduce the surface tension between substances that normally repel each other - so have the same overall purpose. The main difference is how they are used (with emulsifiers forming a particular sub-class of surfactants with a special purpose). Surfactants are (generally) used in cleansing products - they lower the surface tension between oil and water to allow oil and dirt to be washed away in water. In contrast, emulsifiers are really for creams and lotions that need to bring together both water- and oil- based ingredients. It’s a bit confusing because they really are two words to describe the same thing but used for different purposes - one uses its powers for cleaning; the other for mixing.


Some handy skincare concepts.

In the ingredient descriptions, we've put a little * next to each key concept we explain in this section.

What are Antioxidants?

Antioxidants are really important for the skin (and your body more generally) as they help protect you from damage caused by normal life. Lots of scientific studies support the importance of antioxidants and the role they play in skincare – especially in fighting the signs of ageing, like fine lines, sagging skin and pigmentation.  

Our skin is under constant assault by daily life: sun exposure, and air pollution like car exhaust fumes, or cigarette smoke. All these things negatively impact our skin’s ability to repair itself and look healthy. Antioxidants defend our skin from damage by limiting the production of “free radicals”. “Free radicals” are unstable molecules all around us – including in our skin, the air and pollution. They cause havoc by stealing electrons from the healthy cells in our skin. When a “free radical” manages to take an electron from a healthy cell, this causes the healthy skin cell to also become a “free radical” leaving us now with two unbalanced skin-cells. Antioxidants calm the situation by donating their spare electrons to the “free radical” which stops them from causing damage. They manage to calm the “free radicals” without also becoming a problem.

what do Emollients do?

Emollients are crucial in skincare as they create a super fine layer on top of our skin which helps our skin to trap in the moisture. (Don’t worry, the emollients we use don’t clog pores or cause break-outs. Also, in case you were wondering, you won’t feel them sitting on top of your skin. Phew!)

What do Emulsifiers do?

In a nutshell, ingredients with emulsifying properties let two things which normally repel, come nicely together - in skincare this is normally oil and water. They do this by reducing the surface tension between these ingredients, letting them mix and form a great textured product.

If emulsifiers were not included in cosmetics products, you’d see lots of separation between the “incompatible” ingredients. Think of what happens to balsamic vinegar when you add it to olive oil, it sits separately with the balsamic making dark, delicious blobs in the olive oil. If you added an emulsifier, the olive oil and balsamic would mix together as the new ingredient would lower the surface tension between the oil and balsamic. Unlike our olive oil and balsamic mix, in skincare, most of the time we want a nicely blended products that have a lovely consistency. The emulsifier helps us to achieve this by bringing together the normally incompatible ingredients.

You’ll also read about “surfactants” in skincare and they sound an awful lot like they do the same thing as emulsifiers. Both reduce the surface tension between substances that normally repel each other - so have the same overall purpose. The main difference is how they are used (with emulsifiers forming a particular sub-class of surfactants with a special purpose). Surfactants are (generally) used in cleansing products - they lower the surface tension between oil and water to allow oil and dirt to be washed away in water. In contrast, emulsifiers are really for creams and lotions that need to bring together both water- and oil- based ingredients. It’s a bit confusing because they really are two words to describe the same thing but used for different purposes - one uses its powers for cleaning; the other for mixing.



SKINCARE YOU CAN REALLY UNDERSTAND.
🤓⚡








SKINCARE YOU CAN REALLY UNDERSTAND.
🤓⚡